You have no items in your shopping basket
RSS

Our Recipes


Chef's Roasting Tips - Roasting Joint of Beef
Chef's Roasting Tips - Roasting Joint of Beef

Remove the beef from your fridge and allow it to reach room temperature, this is crucial for even cooking of your beef. Cooking beef straight from the fridge can result in the outside of your beef overcooking whilst the inside remains undercooked.

Season the beef with salt and cracked black pepper all over.

Place a heavy based tray on your stove and add a couple of tablespoons of oil. Once hot, sear the beef on all sides. I recommend investing in a good, solid roasting tray for the best results. Thin trays can cause meat to burn and may buckle in the oven.

You can cook the beef on a bed of roughly chopped vegetables or straight on the tray. If cooking directly on the tray, rotate the beef every 20 minutes.

Cook at 190 degrees for 20 minutes and then allow approximately 25 minutes per kilo additional cooking time. Use a probe to identify the core temperature.

  • Medium rare - core temperature of approximately 54 degrees,
  • Medium – 64 degrees
  • Well done – 74 degrees

Once cooked, remove the beef from the oven, cover with tin foil and rest for 20 to 30 minutes before carving.

The most important 3 factors when roasting for perfect results are:

  • remove from the fridge
  • roast
  • rest

Don’t throw away those lovely meat juices. Drain off excess oil, place the tray on top of the stove, heat and add beef stock. If you have made your gravy separately, add the gravy to the pan incorporating all the sticky juices by rubbing the base of the tray vigorously with a spatula (if you have done this properly, your tray will be clean when you tip your gravy in to your jug).

Chef’s Roasting Tips - Lamb Leg, Boned & Rolled
Chef’s Roasting Tips - Lamb Leg, Boned & Rolled

Remove the lamb from your fridge and allow it to reach room temperature, this is crucial for even cooking. Cooking lamb straight from the fridge can result in the outside of your lamb overcooking and becoming dry.

Place the lamb in a heavy based roasting tray. I like to slice some potatoes approximately 1cm thick and place under the lamb, this helps prevent the base drying out and gives you some amazing tasting potatoes. I recommend investing in a good, solid roasting tray for the best results. Thin trays can cause meat to burn and may buckle in the oven.

Drizzle the lamb with vegetable oil and season with salt and cracked black pepper. I stud my lamb with sprigs of rosemary and whole peeled garlic cloves. Halfway through cooking, I brush the lamb with Dijon mustard and cover with a lemon, garlic and rosemary herb crust.

Cook at 180 degrees for 30 minutes then another 25 minutes per 500 grams. Use a probe to identify the core temperature.

  • Pink – 59 degrees
  • Medium - 70 degrees

Once cooked, remove from the oven, cover with foil and rest for 20 to 30 minutes before carving. The foil keeps your lamb warm, juicy and succulent.

The most important 3 factors when roasting for perfect results are:

  • remove from the fridge
  • roast
  • rest

Don’t throw away those lovely meat juices. Drain off excess oil, place the tray on top of the stove, heat and add lamb stock. If you have made your gravy separately, add the gravy to the pan incorporating all the sticky juices by rubbing the base of the tray vigorously with a spatula (if you have done this properly, your tray will be clean when you tip your gravy in to your jug). Add a sprig of rosemary or thyme if you want a little extra flavour, adding a spoon of redcurrant jelly gives you a little sweetness to your gravy.

To produce a jus, deglaze your tray using white wine, add lamb stock and thicken with a little cornflour.

Gratin Dauphinoise
Gratin Dauphinoise
  • Serves 2
  • Prep Time: 20 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 65 Minutes

A seductive combination of layered potatoes and cream, Dauphinois originated in the Dauphiné region of France. As the dish cooks, the layers soften and combine to produce an impressively luxurious flavour and soft texture, with a satisfying golden crunch on the surface. To achieve neat squares, our Chef, Mike, advises to cook in advance and allowing to chill prior to slicing and reheating. If rustic dining is more your style, serve at the table in your favourite earthenware dish.

Lamb Sauce
Lamb Sauce
  • Serves 2
  • Prep Time: 5 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes

We love the simplicity and speed of this sauce that works wonderfully with lamb. Although the sauce takes only a few minutes to make, your fellow diners will be convinced the method is far more complicated. A touch of redcurrant jelly introduces a sweetness perfectly matched to lamb.

Herb Crusted Lamb Rack
Herb Crusted Lamb Rack
  • Serves 2
  • Prep Time: 30 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 Minutes

As they are one of the most exceptional cuts, lamb racks deserve to be elegantly dressed. Our Chef’s Herb Crust recipe delicately enhances without overpowering the flavour of the lamb. Mike favours the traditional garlic, Dijon and herbs but finds using panko crumb achieves a lighter and crispier finish than traditional breadcrumbs.

Pepper Sauce
Pepper Sauce
  • Serves 2
  • Prep Time: 5 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes

One of the most popular sauces, peppercorn adds a creamy, yet piquant, dimension to your favourite steak. Flambé at the brandy stage of the recipe for full Chef effect. Our Chef, Mike, recommends varying the amount of peppercorns to suit your personal taste.